Book of the month: August 2019 picks

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My two picks for the month of August for book of the month are The Whisper Man and The Turn of the Key.

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If you leave a door half open, soon you’ll hear the whispers spoken…

After the sudden death of his wife, Tom Kennedy believes a fresh start will help him and his young son, Jake, heal. A new beginning, a new house, a new town, Featherbank.

But the town has a dark past. Twenty years ago, a serial killer abducted and murdered five residents. Until Frank Carter was finally caught, he was nicknamed “The Whisper Man,” for he would lure his victims out by whispering at their windows at night.

Just as Tom and Jake settle in their new home, a young boy vanishes. His disappearance bears an unnerving resemblance to Frank Carter’s crimes, reigniting old rumors that he preyed with an accomplice. Now, Detectives Amanda Beck and Pete Willis must find the boy before it is too late, even if that means Pete has to revisit his great foe in prison: The Whisper Man.

And then Jake begins acting strangely. He hears a whispering at his window….

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When Rowan Caine stumbles across the ad, she’s looking for something else completely. But it seems like too good an opportunity to miss–a live-in nanny post, wit a staggeringly generous salary. And when she arrives at heatherbrae House she is smitten–by the luxurious “smart” home fitted out with all modern conveniences, by this picture-perfect family.

What she doesn’t know is that she’s stepping into a nightmare–one that will end with a child dead and herself in prison awaiting trial for murder.

Writing to her lawyer from prison, she struggles to explain the unraveling events that led to her incarceration. It wasn’t just the constant surveillance from the cameras installed around the house, or the malfunctioning technology that woke the household with booming music or turned the lights off at the worst possible time. It wasn’t just the girls, who turned out to be a far cry from the immaculately behaved model children she met at her interview. It wasn’t even the way she was left alone for weeks at a time, with no adults around apart from the enigmatic handyman, Jack Grant.

It was everything.

She knows she’s made mistakes. She admits that she lied to obtain the post, and that her behavior toward the children wasn’t ideal. She’s not innocent, by any means. But, she maintains, she’s not guilty– at least not of murder. Which means someone else is.

 


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